Power of Story Telling (49ers vs Seahawks)

aondoe:

FLASHBACK!!!

Originally posted on aondoe:

Patrick Willis story

“Power isn’t about just going forward. It’s about not letting anything hold you back. You find that in yourself, and you can go anywhere you want.”

Russell Wilson story

“My dad always told me three P’s. Persevere Perspective and Purpose”

Derrick Coleman story

“I’ve been deaf since I was 3 so I never listened to them” them being the coaches, the NFL Draft.

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Who has the Biggest Vocab in Hip-Hop

Go to this link and find out: Rapper’s Vocab.

The list ommitted some very talented wordsmith, but the scientist who put it together has a cut off at 2012 for most MC’s and also a 3 album minimum requirement to make the list. So some people didn’t qualify. But, I would’ve loved to see Lupe Fiasco, Del The Funky Homosapien, Ras Kass, Pharoah Monche, Big Pun. I mean the information is very interesting. The Data Scientist’s name is Matt Daniels.

 

Socrates: still making people crazy after all these years

aondoe:

This was a very interesting take on a very essential and interesting event in human history. I didn’t even think of the similarities between MLK and Socrates. Thank you.

Originally posted on e g r e g o r e s:

“Theorists have not been at a loss to explain; but they differ.”
Aleister Crowley, Book Four, Part One

Liberal philosopher Karl Popper (1902-1994) portrayed Plato as possibly the world’s first fascist, and one often hears people (who have probably never read a single word written by Popper, nor even know his name) mindlessly repeating something similar. Plato also has his defenders, including even Marxists, like Sean Sayers, as well as non-Marxists like Leo Strauss (1899-1973) and his followers (yes – the people who brought us Neoconservatism and the invasion of Iraq).

Socrates, however, continues to stir even more controversy and disagreement than his most famous student – although it is easier to find actual detractors of Plato than of his teacher. Popper, even while condemning Plato as a totalitarian, lauded Socrates as a friend of democracy. Nietzsche had imagined Socrates to be his own “greatest, and closest, philosophical rival”…

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